Camino, Camino de Santiago, Short Fiction, Short Story

My WCSC 2nd Place Short Story Contest Entry – Helen Finds Her Way to After

What follows here is my short story Helen Finds Her Way to After, which won 2nd Place in the 2017 Writers’ Community of Simcoe County’s Short Story Contest. Unfortunately, the WCSC has since become defunct. My short story had been published on their website, which no longer exists. So, I’m sharing it here.

HELEN FINDS HER WAY TO AFTER

 Both of Helen’s feet bled steadily as she walked. She fought to ignore the blisters making a nasty soup of blood and puss in the heel of each of her merino wool socks. It was nine a.m. With each passing hour she lost a little more of her will to carry on. She held on to the memory of her ex-husband’s laughter at the folly she displayed in thinking she could make this journey. She carried her daughter Meagan’s doubt, freely given when she had told her of her goal. Their lack of support was perhaps the only thing left to propel Helen forward to Santiago de Compostela. And to the apostle James, whose bones lay waiting for her there, whether she made it to the cathedral or not.

Must keep walking. It had become a mantra Helen hated just as much as she needed. Must keep walking.  

Helen’s left baby toenail had fallen off two days earlier, somewhere between Sarria and Portomarin. She had mourned for a moment before bandaging up what was left and carrying on. Must keep walking. Rationality had left her long ago.  

“Buen Camino,” a couple mumbled in tandem as they passed her by on a narrow dirt pathway leading to a cobbled bridge. Their walking sticks click-click-clicked as they walked by without looking up from the uneven ground.  

“Buen Camino,” she said before reentering her gloomy thoughts.  

Continue reading “My WCSC 2nd Place Short Story Contest Entry – Helen Finds Her Way to After”

Author Spotlight, On Writing, Pride Must Be A Place, Word Up Barrie

An Appearance at Word Up Barrie

This coming Thursday I’ll be making an appearance at Word Up Barrie in Barrie, Ontario at the Unity Market Cafe and Studios. Show starts at 7pm.

cropped-wp-image-1093024262.jpg
Click on this rack of shirts to buy one or two or all my books on Amazon. I know you wanna…

Author Event this coming THURSDAY (November 8th, 2018) in Barrie, Ontario! Please come and join me and the good people at WORD UP BARRIE as they host me as one of their two feature authors at a reading taking place at Unity Market Cafe & Studios this coming THURSDAY. Event begins at 7pm.

wordup

NaNoWriMo, On Writing

Novel Aesthetic for NaNoWriMo, Explained

So, one of the prompts for the #LGBTQwrimo hashtag calendar over on Twitter for the month of November is to create a novel aesthetic for your WIP (work in progress). I don’t usually do these, but I’m attempting to do all the month’s prompts. So, here is the NA for my current WIP, which is tentatively titled Aaron With an E:

 

FB_IMG_1541441733305
Novel Aesthetic – Aaron with an E

I didn’t really get a chance to break the aesthetic down on Twitter, so I thought I would do so here. So, my novel aesthetic…in six photos. (The six photos are referenced below and are highlighted in the pseudo-synopsis below:

In the top left corner, we have my main character, Aaron. Aaron is going through the discover process of realizing they are non-binary. They are in Grade 7 at Riverside Elementary. Every year Aaron has gone to a different school. Their father does not have his shit together and he’s moved the two of them around from city to city in his attempts to stay employed and sheltered under a roof. Aaron is always the new kid in school. On their first day of school, Aaron finds out that Grade 7s always have a talent show. Every year, there is the annual Riverside’s Got Talent show. The talent comes from the grad 7 class and participation is mandatory. The behind the scenes crew are the grade 8 class. Aaron is lumped in with Conrad and Zack and together the three students need to discover their talent and produce something to showcase it for the competition. Aaron realizes up front that the biggest competition is the hottest boy in the whole class and his group of friends. Billy is the lead singer of the actual band his group comprises of. Aaron has a super crush on him and also fears competing against the hottest band since the beginning of time. Aaron, Zack and Conrad discover a mutual love of manga and graphic novels when they come across The Prince and the Dressmaker by Jen Wang in the school library. Each has dabbled in drawing comic books and in a last ditched effort to come up with a talent before the teacher automatically assigns one, the three students decide to create a new comic and turn it into a short video by utilizing each of their talents.

We shall see how this goes.

Happy Nanowrimo’ing, writers!

 

 

 

Camino de Santiago, On Writing, Short Story

As it is On the Camino, So Shall it be In Writing – Intentions

You may have noticed by now that I relate things to a circle of a few of my favourite obsessions…most notably music lyrics and the Camino de Santiago. Okay, and Paris. Paris is the filter for all of life. Today, while writing a short story for a specific short story contest deadline that is quickly approaching, I stopped in my tracks and said, “What are your intentions?”

That sentence, or variants of it, were heard and overheard on my pilgrimage on the Camino de Santiago almost constantly. “What are your intentions?”, “What is your intention?” “But what are your Camino intentions?”

intention

 

Today, I had begun a short story without having intentions. It’s a habit of mine, like watching the sun go down (excuse the gratuitous song-lyric relating). I write without purpose or plan or intention quite often. I always had faith that the story would reveal itself to me as I went along. Whatever I start doing to my characters, they’ll eventually discover a path for the plot, arc, story, etc…and they’ll take it from there. They’ll run with it. Why should I do all the work? I did create them, after all. They shouldn’t be so lazy. They should pull their weight. I shouldn’t have to do everything.

37888_413271717020_5214398_n
I’m SUCH a lazy writer…

Enter lately. Lately is not a friend to my style of writing because lately I am discovering that stories are fizzing out, ending abruptly in a puddle of purposelessness. I can’t always rely on my narrators and characters to see the story through to the end after all. That’s a nasty realization. Am I getting old? Is my memory slipping? Am I losing my mind?

Or have I just been too lazy to do things properly, and up until now very very lucky that it seems to work out in the end anyway? I’m suspecting this is most likely the case.

Today I full-tilt stopped writing long enough to ask myself, “BUT WHAT IS YOUR INTENTION!?” When I looked around me and came to the realization that I did not in fact have my backpack on–and I was not in fact in the north of Spain on a dirt path following yellow arrows all the way to Santiago de Compostela–I knew that I had struck a chord. As much as pilgrims on the Camino talk about carrying intentions and purpose for their pilgrimage, so too should writers carry intentions and purpose for their stories. We should always ask ourselves what those intentions are. If we do not know, then do we have any business whatsoever even writing the story in question?

Probably not.

This is my new plan. Before I run headlong into a story, I’m going to demand of myself what my intentions are for the story. Not quite the same as Camino Intentions, but the same idea. I won’t rely so much on my characters to figure out the plot path. I should do the heavy lifting. I’m the one wearing the backpack. I’m such a lazy writer, you have NO idea.

On the Camino, we often answer the WHAT IS YOUR INTENTION? question with things like I will be okay if I need to slow down today. I will not be judgemental today. I will be kind to others today. I will release something that I am holding onto today. I will breathe today. We choose these daily intentions and we walk while meditating on them.

In writing, I think my answer to the WHAT IS YOUR INTENTION? question is quite obvious…even though I have almost never held myself to such scrutiny while exploring story.

Today I set up a homeless guy to spend the night taking refuge in a hidden cubbyhole in a library. It began interestingly enough. I thought it went well, actually. The hoops he had to jump through to pull off the deed seemed plausible. He overcame the odds and tricked the library staff into forgetting him. He made it! Victory. He found himself alone in the library overnight.

Then, once the dust settled and the character glared at me awaiting the next move in his adventure, I hit the proverbial brick wall. That’s when, without thinking, I whispered that age-old Camino question to myself. WHAT IS YOUR INTENTION? I have/had absolutely no idea. Getting him locked inside was the extent of my vested interest in the story. Clearly that’s not enough. The STORY has to be about what happens after the set-up succeeds. CLEARLY!

It’s high time I started asking myself these rather important questions prior to wasting several thousand words on a story that is not a story. I don’t need to outline. God knows I’ve tried doing that enough times to know it doesn’t work for me. But I DO need to know my intention. I need to know what I want the story to be about prior to sitting down to write it…at the very least. At the bear minimum I should know what the bloody story is going to be about.

I have to stop doing this to myself.

So, do yourself a favour. And not only at the beginning of your story, but all the way through it. Whether it’s a novel or a short story…or a poem or an article or an essay or a blog post. Ask yourself that all important question at every step of the journey. WHAT IS YOUR INTENTION? If you don’t know what your intention/motivation is, figure it out. It’s better than leaving yourself high and dry or leaving your poor character abandoned in a library overnight with nothing to do. You deserve better and so does your character. Don’t do what I did. As obvious as it is that a writer should ask themselves what the hell it is they want to accomplish in a story, they sometimes forget to do so.

Say it with me now…

WHAT IS YOUR INTENTION?